Why Journaling is Important on your Scrapbook Layouts

A picture paints a thousand words!

But do you know what?

Sometimes that’s just not enough!

Often we create our scrapbook layouts as visual pieces of art with our photo as the centerpiece. And we leave the photo to tell the story. That might work when the event is still fresh in our minds. But what about when we (or some other members of the family) look at it in a few years? What about when your child looks at it in ten years time? Will he or she remembers the story of the event? Or will you need to be there to explain it to them and prod their memory?

We really need to provide some journaling ‘back-up’ to our scrapbook layouts. It forms the foundation, if you like, for our creative presentation of the moment.

Sometimes the story can be long and detailed, and your journaling will need to be an integral element in your scrapbook layout design. And sometimes you will just place a few factual anchors, like who the people in the photo are, when it was taken and where.

That may not tell the story of the photo but at least there’ll be a little context. This is especially true with a lot of your heritage photos, where you may well not know the story and sadly those who did may no longer be with you. I know I have this frustration. I have a bunch of old photos that my parents have kept over the years. When I was younger I didn’t really care much about them, but now I want to know more about those moments and people. Who they were and how they fit into my own history.

And sadly it’s too late. I didn’t capture those stories when my parents were alive and now there’s no one to tell them.

I don’t want that to happen to my daughter. I know that when she is older she too will want to know about life in the ‘olden days’ and I may not be there to explain the significance of the people, places and moments in the photos, and more importantly, what they meant to me. So, although journaling does not come naturally to me, I have to find ways to add some verbal back-up detail to my layouts.

So I urge you to try to include some journaling on your own scrapbook layouts. Try this scrapbook idea if you are struggling with what to say after writing the who, when and where:

Look at the photo. What’s your initial emotion? Write it down on a scrap of paper.

Then journal this:

“Looking at this photo always makes me feel………….. . You look so ……………. that I have to smile, even when I’m feeling down.”

You can use variations on this for a few of your layouts and before you know it, you’ll start to find journaling will come easier to you.

Just think how you would feel if you looked at your Mother’s or Grandmother’s scrapbook and you read something like that. Wouldn’t it move you? Wouldn’t it be really special?

Don’t your kid’s deserve to feel that too?

This is the first in a two part series on Journaling. Stay tuned for the second installment next week.

If you think this would be of interests to other scrapbookers, I love it if you would link to the article in your own blogs and maybe give it a thumbs up on StumbleUpon.

Part 2: Scrapbook Journaling with Your Own Handwriting

Step by Step Digital Scrapbook
The digital scrapbooking course that’s designed especially for beginners.
Learn how to digital scrapbook and create wonderful art works from your photos quickly and easily on your computer.
No mess, no special workspace needed, no cleaning up.

, ,

8 Responses to Why Journaling is Important on your Scrapbook Layouts

  1. Sandra Foyt July 3, 2008 at 1:02 pm #

    My friend and I argue which is more important, journaling or creating a beautiful layout. Lately, I’ve been focused more on writing in my blogs than going through the backload of unfinished scrapbook projects.

    Perhaps there is a way to used digital scrapbooking to catch up before it’s too late to get the story.

    Thanks for giving me something to think about!

  2. karooch July 3, 2008 at 2:16 pm #

    I must admit, I find journaling is so much easier with digital scrapbooking Sandra. I can fit my journaling easily into whatever space I have and tits easy to change it if I want to after I’ve completed the layout. But hey, that’s just a personal preference.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Why Journaling is Important on your Scrapbook Layouts | Scraps Of Mind - July 2, 2008

    […] 03:06:27 pm on July 2, 2008 | # | Tags: digital scrapbook, journaling, scrapbook, scrapbook layouts A picture paints a thousand words! But do you know what? Sometimes that’s just not enough! Often we create our scrapbook layouts as visual pieces of art with our photo as the centerpiece. And we leave the photo to tell the story. That might work when the event is still fresh in our minds. But what about when we (or some other members of the family) look at it in a few years? What about when your child looks at it in ten years time? Will he or she remembers the story of the event? Or will you need to be there to explain it to them and prod their memory? Sourse: Why Journaling is Important on your Scrapbook Layouts | Scraps Of Mind […]

  2. Great New Series Starting on Scraps of Mind This Week | Scraps Of Mind - September 1, 2008

    […] Why Journaling is Important on Your Scrapbook Layouts […]

  3. Scrapbooking the Sad and the Bad - June 24, 2009

    […] Why Journaling is Important in Your Scrapbook Layouts […]

  4. Scraps Of Mind » Blog Archive » Do you make Scrapbook Layouts without Photos? - May 7, 2010

    […] don’t let these memories get washed away on the river of time. Create some journal based scrapbook layouts and preserve them for your children, and also for you in future […]

  5. Scrapbook Journaling with Your Handwriting — Scraps Of Mind - October 13, 2012

    […] Journaling with Your Handwriting Last week I wrote about the importance of including journaling on your scrapbook […]

  6. Haiku Your Journaling — Scraps Of Mind - October 13, 2012

    […] Why Journaling is Important on Your Scrapbook Layouts […]